play_arrow

keyboard_arrow_right

skip_previous play_arrow skip_next
00:00 00:00
playlist_play chevron_left
volume_up
chevron_left
  • cover play_arrow

    Music 24/7 - Feel the vibe
    Online Radio

  • cover play_arrow

    Talk Shows - Stay Updated
    Online Radio

  • cover play_arrow

    Pillars and Plants - Gospel
    Online Radio

  • cover play_arrow

    Audio Stories - A new movie experience
    Online Radio

  • cover play_arrow

    Welcome to the Leading Lifestyle Internet Radio
    Online Radio

  • Home
  • keyboard_arrow_right News
  • keyboard_arrow_right Taliban Release Decree Saying Women Must Consent To Marriage

News

Taliban Release Decree Saying Women Must Consent To Marriage

Oluwaseye Ogunsanya December 3, 2021 21


Background
share close

Afghanistan’s Taliban government on Friday released a decree on women’s rights which made it known that women should not be considered “property” and must agree to marriage but failed to mention female access to education or work outside the home.

The Taliban has been under pressure from the international community, who have mostly frozen funds for Afghanistan, to commit to upholding women’s rights since the hardline Islamist group took over the country on Aug. 15.

“A woman is not a property, but a noble and free human being; no one can give her to anyone in exchange for peace…or to end animosity,” the Taliban decree, released by spokesman Zabihillah Muhajid, said.

It set out the rules governing marriage and property for women, stating women should not be forced into marriage and widows should have share in their late husband’s property.

According to the decree, courts should take note of the rules when making decisions, and religious affairs and information ministries should promote these rights.

However, it did not mention women being able to work or access facilities outside the home or education, which have been major concerns from the international community.

During its previous rule from 1996 to 2001, the Taliban banned women from leaving the house without a male relative and full face and head covering and girls from receiving education.

The Taliban say they have changed and high schools for girls in some provinces have been allowed to operate. But many women and rights advocates remain in doubt.

The international community, which has frozen billions in central bank funds and development spending, has made women’s rights a key element of any future engagement with Afghanistan.

The country, which is also suffering from a banking liquidity crisis as the cash flow dries up due to sanctions, is facing the risk of economic collapse since the Taliban took over.

Tagged as: , , .

Rate it
Previous post
close
  • 13

Headlines

Headline: WHO Chief Scientist Says Omicron ‘Quite Infectious’, Must Not Panic

Oluwaseye Ogunsanya December 3, 2021

The World Health Organization’s chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan told the Reuters Next conference on Friday that while the new coronavirus variant Omicron appeared to be very transmissible, the right response […]

Read more trending_flat

Post comments (0)

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *